Kilimanjaro

I’ve just come back from a trip to Tanzania, where I, together with 7 others (and a lot of guides and porters), climbed up Kilimanjaro. An absolutely fantastic experience that I’d not want to be without – and at the same time something that I’ve no interest in doing again – at least not within the next couple of years ;)

It was incredibly exhausting – especially the last trek to the summit – and I didn’t get to take quite as many pictures as I’d assumed I would. Mainly because a DSLR is a bit cumbersome to get out whenever there’s an interesting subject, but also because my habit of holding my breath when taking pictures, makes managing with thin air quite tough.

In any case though – I did get around to taking a few hundred shots – gallery is below (6/4 – Updated with the last set of photos).

Amazing sunset

Had an amazing sunset on the last day of my summer-holiday, with the sun basically shining up on the clouds from below. Lying on the couch watching Top Gear, I had to hurry outside with the camera once I noticed what was going on. Managed to get a few shots, although they don’t really do it justice.

Real-time Linux Kernel drivers – Part 3, the better and best implementations

– continued from part 2.

My first attempt at creating a 100 Hz real-time Linux kernel loop did not work as expected. After getting some good pointers from the linux-rt-users mailing list, and doing some further investigations myself, I decided to reimplement the loop using usleep_range() (further described here). This function basically just sleeps for a specified time (given a minimum and a maximum time to sleep), and thus does not need to have callbacks or similar specified. It should therefore be straight-forward to just create a new thread calling usleep_range() after each iteration, and then schedule it with the real-time scheduler.

Continue reading %s